The Ultimate Resource About Football World Cup History

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Today we’re with some historic records about Football world because we’re just around the world cup 2010 from south Africa, so we decide to share some thrilling results about FIFA Football world up with the help of wikipedia and world cup years these are best resource where we can get historic data about football world cup games.

The FIFA World Cup, also called the Football World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the men’s national teams of the members of Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport’s global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not contested because of World War II.

The current format of the tournament involves 32 teams competing for the title at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about a month this phase is often called the World CupFinals. A qualification phase, which currently takes place over the preceding three years, is used to determine which teams qualify for the tournament together with the host nation(s).

During the 18 tournaments that have been held, seven nations have won the title. Brazil have won the World Cup a record five times, and they are the only team to have played in every tournament. Italy, the current champions, have won four titles, and Germany are next with three titles. The other former champions are Uruguay, winners of the inaugural tournament, and Argentina, with two titles each, and England and France, with one title each.

The World Cup is the most widely-viewed sporting event in the world; an estimated 715.1 million people watched the final match of the 2006 World Cup held in Germany. The next World Cup will be held in South Africa, between 11 June and 11 July 2010, and the 2014 World Cup will be held in Brazil.

1930 Uruguay

Uruguay_1930_Worl_Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural edition of the world championship for international association football teams the FIFA World Cup. It was played in Uruguay from 13 July to 30 July. Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) selected Uruguay as host nation as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its independence, and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

Thirteen teams, seven from South America, four from Europe and two from North America entered the tournament. Few European teams chose to participate due to the duration and cost of travel. The teams were divided into four groups, with the winner of each group progressing to the semi-finals. The first two World Cup matches took place simultaneously, and were won by France and the USA, who defeated Mexico 4–1 and Belgium 3–0, respectively. Lucien Laurent of France scored the first goal in World Cup history.

Argentina, Uruguay, the USA and Yugoslavia each won their respective groups to qualify for the semi-finals. In the final, hosts and pre-tournament favorites Uruguay defeated Argentina in front of a crowd of 93,000 people, and became the first nation to win a World Cup.

Statistics

Although, unlike in subsequent World Cups, there had been no qualifying competition, one principle was established for the future: the groups were divided so as to try and achieve as much geographical diversity as possible. The groups were:

Group A

Argentina (seeded) South America
Chile South America
France Europe
Mexico Central America

Group B

Brazil (seeded) South America
Bolivia (seeded) South America
Yugoslavia Europe

Group C

Uruguay (seeded) South America
Romania Europe
Peru South America

Group D

USA (seeded) North America
Belgium Europe
Paraguay South America

The individual team results (half time scores in brackets) were:

GROUP A GROUP B
France – Mexico 4:1 (3:0)
Argentina – France 1:0 (0:0)
Chile – Mexico 3:0 (1:0)
Chile – France 1:0 (0:0)
Argentina – Mexico 6:3 (3:0)
Argentina – Chile 3:1 (2:1)
Yugoslavia – Brazil 2:1 (2:0)
Yugoslavia – Bolivia 4:0 (0:0)
Brazil – Bolivia 4:0 (1:0)
GROUP C GROUP D
Romania – Peru 3:1 (1:0)
Uruguay – Peru 1:0 (0:0)
Uruguay – Romania 4:0 (3:0)
USA – Belgium 3:0 (2:0)
USA – Paraguay 3:0 (2:0)
Paraguay – Belgium 1:0 (1:0)

Tabulating this gives:

Group A
Team Pts P W D L F A
Argentina 6 3 3 0 0 10 4
Chile 4 3 2 0 1 5 3
France 2 3 1 0 2 4 3
Mexico 0 3 0 0 3 4 13
Group B
Team Pts P W D L F A
Yugoslavia 4 2 2 0 0 6 1
Brazil 2 2 1 0 1 5 2
Bolivia 0 2 0 0 2 0 8
Group C
Team Pts P W D L F A
Uruguay 4 2 2 0 0 5 0
Romania 2 2 1 0 1 3 5
Peru 0 2 0 0 2 1 4
Group D
Team Pts P W D L F A
USA 4 2 2 0 0 6 0
Paraguay 2 2 1 0 1 1 3
Belgium 0 2 0 0 2 0 4

The semi-finals emphatically justified the seeding, Uruguay and Argentina crushed their opponents Yugoslavia and the USA by the identical score line of 6-1.

SEMI-FINALS (half time scores in brackets)
Argentina – USA 6:1 (1:0)
Uruguay – Yugoslavia 6:1 (3:1)

FINAL (half time scores in brackets)
July 30, 1930
Uruguay – Argentina 4:2 (1:2)

Attendance: 90, 000

Teams:

Uruguay:

Ballesteros, Nasazzi, Mascheroni, Andrade, Fernandez, Gestido, Dorado, Scarone, Castro, Cea, Iriarte.

Scorers: Dorado, Cea, Iriarte, Castro.
Argentina:

Botasso, Della Torre, Paternoster, J. Evaristo, Monti, Suarez, Peucelle, Varallo, Stabile, Ferreira, M. Evaristo.

Scorers: Peucelle, Stabile.

Referee: J. Langenus.

Italy 1934

WorldCup1934poster

The 1934 FIFA World Cup, or the World’s Cup as it was known then, was the second football World Cup staged, and hosted by Italy from 27 May to 10 June. Italy was chosen as hosts by FIFA at the Stockholm congress of October 1932. It was the first World Cup for which teams would have to qualify in order to take part. 32 nations entered the competition, and after qualification, 16 teams participated in the finals tournament. Italy became the second World Cup champions, beating Czechoslovakia in the final, 2–1.

Statistics

The first round scores were (half time scores in brackets):

Italy 7 (3) The United States 1 (0)
Attendance 30, 000

Czechoslovakia 2 (0) Romania 1 (1)
Attendance not available

Germany 5 (1) Belgium 2 (2)
Attendance 8, 000

Austria 3 (1) (after extra time) France 2 (1)
Attendance not available

Spain 3 (2) Brazil 1 (0)
Attendance not available

Switzerland 3 (2) The Netherlands 2 (1)
Attendance not available

Sweden 3 (1) Argentina 2 (1)
Attendance not available

Hungary 4 (2) Egypt 2 (1)
Attendance not available

Quarter final results (half time scores in brackets):

Austria 2 (1) Hungary 1 (0)
Attendance not available

Italy 1 (0) Spain 1 (1) after extra time
Attendance 35,000

Italy 1 (1) Spain 0 (0) replay
Attendance 43,000

Germany 2 (0) Sweden 1 (0)
Attendance 3,000

Czechoslovakia 3 (1) Switzerland 2 (1)
Attendance not available

Semi-final results (half time scores in brackets):

Italy 1 (1) Austria 0 (0)
Attendance 60,000

Czechoslovakia 3 (1) Germany 1 (1)
Attendance 10,000

Final (half time score in brackets):

Italy 2 (0) Czechoslovakia 1 (0) after extra time.
Attendance 55,000

Teams:

Italy: Combi, Monzeglio, Allemandi, Ferraris IV, Monti, Bertolini, Guaita, Meazza, Schiavio, Ferrari, Orsi.

Czechoslovakia: Planicka, Zenisek, Ctyroky, Kostalek, Cambal, Krcil, Junek, Svoboda, Sobotka, Nejedly, Puc.
For the first time there was a play-off for third place, which Germany secured by beating Austria 3-2.

France 1938

396px-WorldCup1938poster

The 1938 FIFA World Cup was the third staging of the World Cup, and was held in France from 4 June to 19 June. France was chosen as hosts by FIFA in August 1936. Italy retained the championship, beating Hungary 4–2 in the final.

Statistics

The first round scores were (half time scores in brackets):

Switzerland 1 (1) – Germany 1 (1) after extra time.
Attendance 30, 000.

Switzerland 4 (1) – Germany 2 (2) replay
Attendance 22, 000.

Cuba 3 (1) – Rumania 3 (1) after extra time.
Attendance 6, 000.

Cuba 2 (0) – Rumania 1 (1) replay
Attendance 5, 000.

Hungary 6 (4) – Dutch East Indies 0 (0)
Attendance Not available.

France 3 (2) – Belgium 1 (1)
Attendance Not available.

Czechoslovakia 3 (0) – Netherlands 0 (0)
Attendance Not available.

Brazil 6 (3) – Poland 5 (1)
Attendance Not available.

Italy 2 (1) – Norway 1 (0)
Attendance Not available.

The second round scores were (half time scores in brackets):

Sweden 8 (4) – Cuba 0 (0)
Attendance Not available.

Hungary 2(1)- Switzerland 0 (0)
Attendance Not available.

Italy 3(1) – France 1(1)
Attendance 58, 000

Brazil 1 (1) – Czechoslovakia 1 (0) after extra time.
Attendance 25, 000

Brazil 2 (0) – Czechoslovakia 1 (1) replay
Attendance Not available.
The semi-final scores were (half time scores in brackets):

Italy 2(0) – Brazil 1 (0)
Attendance 35, 000

Hungary 5 (3) – Sweden 1 (1)
Attendance 17, 000.
World Cup final, played on 19 June 1938 in Paris.

Italy 4 (3) – Hungary 2 (1)
Attendance 55, 000.

Players:

Italy: Olivieri, Foni, Rava, Serantoni, Andreoli, Locatelli, Biavati, Meazza, Piola, Ferrari, Colaussi.

Hungary : Szabo, Polgar, Biro, Szaly, Szucs, Lazar, Saz, Vincze, Sarosi, Zsengeller, Titkos.
Scorers:

Italy: Colaussi (2), Piola (2).

Hungary: Titkos (1), Sarosi (1).

Referee : Georges Capdeville (France).
Third place play-off

Brazil 4 (1) – Sweden 2 (2)
Attendance Not available.

Brazil 1950

Brazil-1950

The 1950 FIFA World Cup, held in Brazil from 24 June to 16 July, was the fourth FIFA World Cup, and the first staged in 12 years due to World War II. Brazil was chosen as the host country by FIFA in July 1946. It was also the first tournament that the trophy itself would be referred to as the Jules Rimet Cup, to mark the 25th anniversary of Rimet’s presidency of FIFA. It was won by Uruguay, who had won the inaugural competition in 1930, clinching the cup by beating the hosts Brazil 2–1 in the deciding match of the four-team final group (this was the only tournament not decided by a one-match final).

Statistics

The first round results were:

Pool A
Brazil 4 Mexico 0
Yugoslavia 3 Switzerland 0
Brazil 2 Switzerland 2
Yugoslavia 4 Mexico 1
Brazil 2 Yugoslavia 0
Switzerland 2 Mexico 1

Pool B
England 2 Chile 0
Spain 3 United States 1
England 0 United States 1
Spain 2 Chile 0
England 0 Spain 1
Chile 5 United States 2
Pool C
Sweden 3 Italy 2
Sweden 2 Paraguay 2
Italy 2 Paraguay 0

Pool D
Uruguay 8 Bolivia 0

Pool A P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 2 1 0 8 2 5
Yugoslavia 3 2 0 1 7 3 4
Switzerland 3 1 0 1 4 6 3
Mexico 3 0 0 3 2 10 0
Pool B P W D L F A Pts
Spain 3 3 0 0 6 1 6
England 3 1 0 2 2 2 2
Chile 3 1 0 2 5 6 2
United States 3 1 0 2 4 8 2
Pool C P W D L F A Pts
Sweden 2 1 1 0 5 4 3
Italy 2 1 0 1 4 3 2
Paraguay 2 0 1 1 2 4 1
Pool C P W D L F A Pts
Uruguay 1 1 0 1 8 0 2
Bolivia 1 0 0 1 8 0 0

Final round:

Uruguay 2 Spain 2
Brazil 7 Sweden 1
Uruguay 3 Sweden 2
Brazil 6 Spain 1
Sweden 3 Spain 1
Uruguay 2 Brazil 1 (wrongly identified as the final).
World Cup Final

Rio de Janeiro, 17 July 1950.

Attendance: 199, 854

Uruguay: Maspoli, Gonzales, Tejera, Gambetta, Varela, Andrade, Ghiggia, Perez,
Miguez, Schiaffino and Moran.

Scorers: Schiaffino and Ghiggia.

Brazil: Barbosa, Augusto, Juvenal, Bauer, Danilo, Bigode, Friaca, Zizinho,
Ademir, Jair and Chico.

Scorer: Friaca

Referee: George Reader (England).

Switzerland 1954

Switzerland-1954

The 1954 FIFA World Cup, the fifth staging of the World Cup, was held in Switzerland from 16 June to 4 July. As the year saw the 50th anniversary of FIFA, it was appropriate for football’s premier competition to be played in the home of its governing body, and Switzerland was chosen as hosts in July 1946. The tournament still remains as the highest average of goals per game. The tournament was won by West Germany, who defeated Hungary 3–2 in the final, giving them their first title.

Statistics

The first round results were:

Pool One:
Brazil 5 Mexico 0
Yugoslavia 1 France 0
Brazil 1 Yugoslavia 1 (after extra time)
France 3 Mexico 2

Pool Two:
Hungary 9 South Korea 0
Turkey 1 West Germany 4
Hungary 8 West Germany 3
Turkey 7 South Korea 0

Pool Three:
Uruguay 2 Czechoslovakia 0
Austria 1 Scotland 0
Uruguay 7 Scotland 0
Austria 5 Czechoslovakia 0

Pool Four:
England 4 Belgium 4 (after extra time)
Switzerland 2 Italy 1
England 2 Switzerland 0
Italy 4 Belgium 1

Round one tables:

Pool 1 P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 2 1 1 0 6 1 3
Yugoslavia 2 1 1 0 2 1 3
France 2 1 0 1 3 3 2
Mexico 2 0 0 2 2 8 0
Pool 2 P W D L F A Pts
Hungary 2 2 0 0 17 3 4
West Germany 2 1 0 1 7 9 2
Turkey 2 1 0 1 8 4 2
South Korea 2 0 0 2 0 16 0

Second place play-off West Germany 7 Turkey 2

Pool 3 P W D L F A Pts
Uruguay 2 2 0 0 9 0 4
Austria 2 2 0 0 6 0 4
Czechoslovakia 2 0 0 2 0 7 0
Scotland 2 0 0 2 0 8 0
Pool 4 P W D L F A Pts
England 2 1 1 0 6 4 3
Switzerland 2 1 0 1 2 3 2
Italy 2 1 0 1 5 3 2
Belgium 2 0 1 0 5 8 1

Second place play-off Switzerland 4 Italy 1

Quarterfinal results

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 2 (1) Yugoslavia 0 (0)
Attendance 17,000

Hungary 4 (2) Brazil 2 (1)
Attendance 40,000

Austria 7 (5) Switzerland 5 (4)
Attendance 29,000

Uruguay 4 (2) England 2 (1)
Attendance 50,000

Semi-final results

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 6 (1) Austria 1 (0)
Attendance 58,000

Hungary 4 (1) Uruguay 2 (1) after extra time.
Attendance 45,000

Final result
Berne 4 July 1954

West Germany: Turek, Posipal, Kohlmeyer, Eckel, Liebrich, Mai, Rahn,
Morlock, O. Walter, F. Walter, Schäfer.

Hungary: Grosics, Buzansky, Lantos, Bozsik, Lorant, Zakarias,
Czibor, Kocsis, Hidegkuti, Puskas, J. Toth.
Referee: Bill Ling (England).

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 3 (2) Hungary 2 (2)
Attendance 55,000

Scorers: Morlock, Rahn (2) West Germany.
Puskas, Czibor Hungary.

Third place play-off

Austria 3 (1) Uruguay 1 (1)
Attendance 31,000

Sweden 1958

Sweden-1958

The 1958 FIFA World Cup, the sixth staging of the World Cup, was hosted by Sweden from 8 June to 29 June. Sweden was chosen as hosts by FIFA in June 1950. It was won by Brazil, who beat Sweden 5–2 in the final for their first title. As of 2010, this was the only time that a World Cup staged in Europe was not won by a European team. The World Cup marked the debut on the world stage of a precocious, largely unknown 17-year-old known as Pelé.

Statistics

The first round results were:

Pool 1:
West Germany 3 Argentina 1
Czechoslovakia 0 Northern Ireland 1
West Germany 2 Czechoslovakia 2
Northern Ireland 1 Argentina 3
West Germany 2 Northern Ireland 2
Czechoslovakia 6 Argentina 1

Playoff :
Northern Ireland 2 Czechoslovakia 1

Pool 2:
France 7 Paraguay 3
Yugoslavia 1 Scotland 1
France 2 Yugoslavia 3
Paraguay 3 Scotland 2
France 2 Scotland 1
Yugoslavia 3 Paraguay 3


Pool 3:

Sweden 2 Hungary 1
Wales 1 Mexico 1
Sweden 3 Mexico 0
Wales 1 Hungary 1
Sweden 0 Wales 0
Hungary 4 Mexico 0

Playoff :
Wales 2 Hungary 1

Pool 4:
Brazil 0 England 0
Soviet Union 2 Austria 0
England 2 Austria 2
Soviet Union 0 Brazil 2
England 2 Soviet Union 2
Brazil 3 Austria 0

Playoff :
England 0 Soviet Union 1

Pool 1 Tables P W D L F A Pts
West Germany 3 1 2 0 7 5 4
N.Ireland 3 1 1 1 4 5 3
Czechoslovakia 3 1 1 1 8 4 3
Argentina 3 1 0 2 5 10 2
Pool 2 Tables P W D L F A Pts
France 3 2 0 1 11 7 4
Yugoslavia 3 1 2 0 7 6 4
Paraguay 3 1 1 1 9 12 3
Scotland 3 1 0 2 4 6 1
Pool 3 Tables P W D L F A Pts
Sweden 3 2 1 0 5 1 5
Wales 3 0 3 0 2 2 3
Hungary 3 1 1 1 6 3 3
Mexico 3 0 1 2 1 8 1
Pool 4 Tables P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 2 1 0 5 0 5
Soviet Union 3 1 1 1 4 4 3
England 3 0 3 0 4 4 3
Austria 3 0 1 2 2 7 1


Quarterfinal results

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 1 (1) Yugoslavia 0 (0)
Attendance 20,000

Sweden 2 (0) Soviet Union 0 (0)
Attendance 31,900

France 4 (1) Northern Ireland 0 (0)
Attendance 11,800

Brazil 1 (0) Wales 0 (0)
Attendance 25,923


Semi-final results

Half time scores in brackets.

Sweden 3 (1) West Germany 1 (1)
Attendance: 49,471.

Brazil 5 (2) France 2 (1)
Attendance: 27,100.


Final result

Stockholm 29 June 1958

Sweden:
Svensson, Bergmark, Axborn, Boerjesson, Gustavsson, Parling, Hamrin,
Gren, Simonsson, Liedholm, Skoglund.

Brazil:
Gylmar, D. Santos, N. Santos, Zito, Bellini, Orlando, Garrincha, Didi,
Vava, Pelé, Zagalo.

Referee: Bill Ling (England).

Half time scores in brackets.

Sweden 2 (1) Brazil 5 (2)

Attendance 49,737

Scorers:
Liedholm, Simonsson (Sweden)
Vava (2), Pelé (2), Zagalo (Brazil).

Third place play-off

France 6 (3) West Germany 3 (1)
Attendance 32,482

Chile 1962

Chile-1962

The 1962 FIFA World Cup, the seventh staging of the World Cup, was held in Chile from 30 May to 17 June. Chile was chosen as host by FIFA in June 1956, as the World Cup returned to the continent of South America after 12 years. It was won by Brazil, who retained the championship by beating Czechoslovakia 3–1 in the final.

Statistics

The first round results were:

Group 1:
Soviet Union 2 Yugoslavia 0
Uruguay 2 Columbia 1
Soviet Union 4 Columbia 4
Uruguay 1 Yugoslavia 3
Soviet Union 2 Uruguay 1
Yugoslavia 5 Columbia 0
Group 2:
West Germany 2 Chile 0
Italy 3 Switzerland 0
West Germany 0 Italy 0
Chile 3 Switzerland 1
Chile 2 Italy 0
West Germany 2 Switzerland 1

Group 3: Brazil 0 Czechoslovakia 0
Mexico 0 Spain 1
Brazil 2 Mexico 0
Czechoslovakia 1 Spain 0
Brazil 2 Spain 1
Czechoslovakia 1 Mexico 3
Group 4:
Hungary 2 England 1
Argentina 1 Bulgaria 0
Hungary 6 Bulgaria 1
England 3 Argentina 1
Hungary 0 Argentina 0
England 0 Bulgaria 0

Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
Soviet Union 3 2 1 0 8 5 5
Yugoslavia 3 2 0 1 8 3 4
Uruguay 3 1 0 2 4 6 2
Columbia 3 0 1 2 5 11 1
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
W. Germany 3 2 1 0 4 1 5
Chile 3 2 0 1 5 3 4
Italy 3 1 1 1 3 2 3
Switzerland 3 0 0 3 2 8 0
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 2 1 0 4 1 5
Czechoslovakia 3 1 1 1 2 3 3
Mexico 3 1 0 2 3 4 2
Spain 3 1 0 2 2 3 2
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 2 1 0 8 2 5
Czechoslovakia 3 1 1 1 4 3 3
Mexico 3 1 1 1 2 3 3
Spain 3 0 1 2 1 7 1

Quarterfinal results

Half time scores in brackets.

Chile 2 (2) Soviet Union 1 (1)
Attendance 17,268

Yugoslavia 1 (0) West Germany 0 (0)
Attendance 63,264

Brazil 3 (1) England 1 (1)
Attendance 17,736

Czechoslovakia 1 (1) Hungary 0 (0)
Attendance 11,690

Semi-final results

Half time scores in brackets.

Brazil 4 (2) Chile 2 (1)
Attendance 76,594

Czechoslovakia 3 (0) Yugoslavia 1 (0)
Attendance 5,890

Final result
Santiago 17 June 1962

Brazil Gylmar, Santos D., Santos N., Zito, Mauro, Zozimo,
Garrincha, Didi, Vava, Amarildo and Zagalo.
Czechoslovakia Schroiff, Tichy, Novak, Pluskal, Popluhar, Masopust,
Popspichal, Scherer, Kvasnak, Kadabra and Jelinek.
Referee: Nicholai Latyshev (Soviet Union).

Half time scores in brackets.

Czechoslovakia 1 (1) Brazil 3 (1)

Attendance 68,679

Scorers:
Masopust (Czechoslovakia)
Zito, Amarildo and Vava (Brazil).
Third place play-off

Chile 1 (0) Yugoslavia 0 (0)
Attendance 66,697

England 1966

England-1966

The 1966 FIFA World Cup, the eighth staging of the World Cup, was held in England from 11 July to 30 July. England was chosen as hosts by FIFA in August 1960 to celebrate the centenary of the standardisation of football in England. England won the final, beating West Germany 4–2, giving them their first (and to date, only) World Cup win, and becoming the first host to win the tournament since Italy in 1934.

Statistics

The first round results were:

Group 1:
England 0 Uruguay 0
France 1 Mexico 1
Uruguay 2 France 1
England 2 Mexico 0
England 2 France 0
Uruguay 0 Mexico 0

Group 2:
West Germany 5 Switzerland 0
Argentina 2 Spain 1
Spain 2 Switzerland 1
Argentina 0 West Germany 0
Argentina 2 Switzerland 0
West Germany 2 Spain 1

Group 3:
Brazil 2 Bulgaria 0
Portugal 3 Hungary 1
Hungary 3 Brazil 1
Portugal 3 Bulgaria 0
Portugal 3 Brazil 1
Hungary 3 Bulgaria 1

Group 4:
Soviet Union 3 North Korea 0
Italy 2 Chile 0
Soviet Union 1 Italy 0
North Korea 1 Chile 1
Soviet Union 2 Chile 1
North Korea 1 Italy 0

Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
England 3 2 1 0 4 0 5
Uruguay 3 1 2 0 2 1 4
Mexico 3 0 2 1 1 3 2
France 3 0 1 2 2 5 1
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
W. Germany 3 2 1 0 7 1 5
Argentina 3 2 1 0 4 1 5
Spain 3 1 0 2 4 5 2
Switzerland 3 0 0 3 1 9 0
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Portugal 3 3 0 0 9 2 6
Hungary 3 2 0 1 7 5 4
Brazil 3 1 0 2 4 6 2
Bulgaria 3 0 0 3 1 8 0
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
Soviet Union 3 3 0 0 6 1 6
North Korea 3 1 1 1 2 4 3
Italy 3 1 0 2 2 2 2
Chile 3 0 1 2 2 5 1

Quarterfinal results

Half time scores in brackets.

England 1 (0) Argentina 0 (0)
Attendance 90,584
West Germany 4 (1) Uruguay 0 (0)
Attendance 33,751
Portugal 5 (2) North Korea 3 (3)
Attendance 51,780
Soviet Union 2 (1) Hungary 1 (0)
Attendance 26,844
Semi-final results

England 2 (1) Portugal 1 (0)
Attendance 94,493

West Germany 2 (1) Soviet Union 1
Attendance 43,921

Final result
Wembley 30 July 1966

England: Banks, Cohen, Wilson, Stiles, Charlton J, Moore,
Ball, Hurst, Hunt, Charlton R, Peters.
West Germany: Tilkowski, Hottges, Schnellinger, Beckenbauer,
Schulz, Weber, Held, Haller, Seeler, Overath, Emmerich.

Referee: Gottfried Dienst (Switzerland).

Half time scores in brackets.

England 4 (1) West Germany 2 (1) after extra time.

Attendance: 96,924

Scorers:
Hurst (3), Peters (1),
Haller, Weber.
Third place playoff

Portugal 2 (1) Soviet Union 1 (1)
Attendance: 87,696

Mexico 1970

Mexico-1970

The 1970 FIFA World Cup, the ninth staging of the World Cup, was held in Mexico, from 31 May to 21 June. Mexico was chosen as the host nation by FIFA in October 1964. The 1970 tournament was the first World Cup hosted in North America, and the first held outside South America and Europe. In a match-up of two-time World Cup champions, the final was won by Brazil, who beat Italy 4–1. With their third World Cup triumph, Brazil were allowed to keep the Jules Rimet Trophy permanently.

The Brazilian team, featuring the likes of Pelé (who was in his fourth and final World Cup), Carlos Alberto, Clodoaldo, Gérson, Jairzinho, Rivelino, and Tostão, is usually regarded as the greatest attacking World Cup team ever. They won all of their 6 games on the way to the title, and had also won all of their 6 qualifying games on their way to Mexico. This tournament saw the return of free-flowing, attacking play after the physical battles of 1962 and 1966, and is still considered by many fans to be the finest World Cup in history.

Statistics

The first round results were:

Group 1:
Mexico 0 Soviet Union 0
Belgium 3 El Salvador 0
Soviet Union 4 Belgium 1
Mexico 4 El Salvador 0
Soviet Union 2 El Salvador 0
Mexico 1 Belgium 0
Group 2:
Uruguay 2 Israel 0
Italy 1 Sweden 0
Uruguay 0 Italy 0
Sweden 1 Israel 1
Italy 0 Israel 0
Uruguay 0 Sweden 1
Group 3:
England 1 Romania 0
Brazil 4 Czechoslovakia 1
Brazil 1 England 0
Romania 2 Czechoslovakia 1
Brazil 3 Romania 2
England 1 Czechoslovakia 0

Group 4:
Peru 3 Bulgaria 2
West Germany 2 Morocco 1
West Germany 5 Bulgaria 2
Peru 3 Morocco 0
West Germany 3 Peru 1
Morocco 1 Bulgaria 1
Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
Soviet Union 3 2 1 0 6 1 5
Mexico 3 2 1 0 5 0 5
Belgium 3 1 0 2 4 5 2
El Salvador 3 0 0 3 0 9 0
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
Italy 3 1 2 0 1 0 4
Uruguay 3 1 1 1 2 1 3
Sweden 3 1 1 1 2 2 3
Israel 3 0 2 1 1 3 2
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 3 0 0 8 3 6
England 3 2 0 1 2 1 4
Romania 3 1 0 2 4 5 2
Czechoslovakia 3 0 0 3 2 7 0
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
W. Germany 3 3 0 0 10 4 6
Peru 3 2 0 1 7 5 4
Bulgaria 3 0 1 2 5 9 1
Morocco 3 0 1 2 2 6 1

Quarterfinal results

Half time scores in brackets.

England 2 (1) West Germany 3 (0) After extra time.
Attendance 24,000

Italy 4 (1) Mexico 1 (1)
Attendance 24,000

Brazil 4 (2) Peru 2 (1)
Attendance 54,000

Uruguay 1 (0) Soviet Union 0 (0)
Attendance 45,000.

Semi-final results

Half time scores in brackets.

Brazil 3 (1) Uruguay 1 (1)
Attendance 51,000

West Germany 3 (0) Italy 4 (1)
Attendance 80,000

Final result
Mexico City 21 June 1970

Brazil: Felix, Carlos Alberto, Brito, Piaza, Everaldo,
Gerson, Clodoaldo, Jairzinho, Pelé, Tostao, Rivelino.
Italy: Albertosi, Burgnich, Cera, Rosato, Fachetti, Bertino (74 Juliano),
Riva, Domenghini, Mazzola, De Sisti, Boninsegna (85 Rivera).

Referee: Rudi Glockner (East Germany).

Half time scores in brackets.

Brazil 4 (1) Italy 1 (1)
Attendance: 107,000

Scorers:
Pelé (17), Gerson (65), Jairzinho (70), Carlos Alberto (86);
Boninsegna (37).

Third place playoff

West Germany 1 (1) Uruguay 0 (0)
Attendance: 104,000.

Germany 1974

Germany-1974

The 1974 FIFA World Cup, the tenth staging of the World Cup, was held in West Germany from 13 June to 7 July. West Germany had been chosen in July 1966 as hosts by FIFA. The tournament marked the first time that the current trophy, the FIFA World Cup Trophy, created by the Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, was awarded. The previous trophy, the Jules Rimet Trophy, was won for the third time by Brazil in 1970 and awarded permanently to the Brazilians. The host nation won the title beating the Netherlands in the final, 2–1. The victory was the second for West Germany, who had won in 1954.

Statistics

The first round divisions were:

Group 1:
West Germany
East Germany
Chile
Australia

Group 2:
Brazil
Yugoslavia
Scotland
Zaire

Group 3:
The Netherlands
Sweden
Uruguay
Bulgaria

Group 4:
Italy
Argentina
Poland
Haiti.

The first round results were:

Group 1:
West Germany 1 Chile 0
East Germany 2 Australia 0
East Germany 1 Chile 1
West Germany 3 Australia 0
West Germany 0 East Germany 1
Australia 0 Chile 0

Group 2:
Brazil 0 Yugoslavia 0
Scotland 2 Zaire 0
Brazil 0 Scotland 0
Yugoslavia 9 Zaire 0
Yugoslavia 1 Scotland 1
Brazil 3 Zaire 0

Group 3:
The Netherlands 2 Uruguay 0
Sweden 0 Bulgaria 0
The Netherlands 0 Sweden 0
Uruguay 1 Bulgaria 1
The Netherlands 4 Bulgaria 1
Sweden 3 Uruguay 0

Group 4:
Italy 3 Haiti 1
Argentina 2 Poland 3
Argentina 1 Italy 1
Poland 7 Haiti 0
Poland 2 Italy 1
Argentina 4 Haiti 1

Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
East Germany 3 2 1 0 4 1 5
West Germany 3 2 0 1 4 1 4
Chile 3 0 2 1 1 2 2
Australia 3 0 1 2 0 5 1
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
Yugoslavia 3 1 2 0 10 1 4
Brazil 3 1 2 0 3 0 4
Scotland 3 1 2 0 3 1 4
Zaire 3 0 0 3 0 14 0
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Netherlands 3 2 1 0 6 1 5
Sweden 3 1 2 0 3 0 4
Bulgaria 3 0 2 1 2 5 2
Uruguay 3 0 1 2 1 5 1
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
Poland 3 3 0 0 12 3 6
Argentina 3 1 1 1 7 5 3
Italy 3 1 1 1 5 4 3
Haiti 3 0 0 3 2 14 0

Group A:
The Netherlands
Brazil
East Germany
Argentina

and

Group B:
West Germany
Poland
Sweden
Yugoslavia.

The second round results were:

Group A:
Netherlands 4 Argentina 0
Brazil 1 East Germany 0
Netherlands 2 East Germany 0
Brazil 2 Argentina 1
Netherlands 2 Brazil 0
East Germany 1 Argentina 1

Group B:
West Germany 2 Yugoslavia 0
Poland 1 Sweden 0
Poland 2 Yugoslavia 1
West Germany 4 Sweden 2
West Germany 1 Poland 0
Sweden 2 Yugoslavia 1

Round two tables:

Group A P W D L F A Pts
Netherlands 3 3 0 0 8 0 6
Brazil 3 2 0 1 3 3 4
East Germany 3 0 1 2 1 4 1
Argentina 3 0 1 2 2 7 1
Group B P W D L F A Pts
West Germany 3 3 0 0 7 2 6
Poland 3 2 0 1 3 2 4
Sweden 3 1 0 2 4 6 2
Yugoslavia 3 0 0 3 2 6 0

Final result
Munich 7 June 1974

West Germany: Maier, Vogts, Schwarzenbeck, Beckenbauer, Breitner,
Hoeness, Grabowski, Müller, Overath, Hölzenbein.

The Netherlands: JongBloed, Suurbier, Rijsbergen (69 De Jong), Haan,
Krol, Jansen, Van Hanegem, Neeskens, Rep, Cruyff,
Resenbrink (46 Van Der Kerkhof).

Referee: Jack Taylor (England).

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 2 (2) The Netherlands 1 (1)
Attendance: 77,833

Scorers:
Breitner (25), Müller (43);
Neeskens (2).

Third place playoff

Poland 1 (0) Brazil 0 (0)
Attendance: 79,000.

Argentina 1978

Argentina-1978

The 1978 FIFA World Cup, the 11th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in Argentina between 1 June and 25 June. Argentina was chosen as hosts by FIFA in July 1966. The 1978 World Cup was won by Argentina who beat the Netherlands 3–1 after extra time in the final. This win was the first World Cup title for Argentina who became the fifth team (after Uruguay, Italy, England, and West Germany), to be both hosts and world champions.

Statistics

The first round divisions were:

Group 1:
Argentina
Italy
France
Hungary

Group 2:
West Germany
Poland
Mexico
Tunisia

Group 3:
Brazil
Spain
Austria
Sweden

Group 4:
The Netherlands
Scotland
Peru
Iran

The first round results were:

Group 1:
France 1 Italy 2
Argentina 2 Hungary 1
Italy 3 Hungary 1
Argentina 2 France 1
Argentina 0 Italy 1
France 3 Hungary 1

Group 2:
West Germany 0 Poland 0
Tunisia 3 Mexico 1
West Germany 6 Mexico 0
Poland 1 Tunisia 0
West Germany 0 Tunisia 0
Poland 3 Mexico 1

Group 3:
Spain 1 Austria 2
Sweden 1 Brazil 1
Sweden 0 Austria 1
Brazil 0 Spain 0
Brazil 1 Austria 0
Sweden 0 Spain 1

Group 4:
Scotland 1 Peru 3
The Netherlands 3 Iran 0
Scotland 1 Iran 1
The Netherlands 0 Peru 0
Scotland 3 The Netherlands 2
Peru 4 Iran 1

Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
Italy 3 3 0 0 6 2 6
Argentina 3 2 0 1 4 3 4
France 3 1 0 2 5 5 2
Hungary 3 0 0 3 3 8 0
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
Poland 3 2 1 0 4 1 5
West Germany 3 1 2 0 6 0 4
Tunisia 3 1 1 1 3 2 3
Mexico 3 0 0 3 2 12 0
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Austria 3 2 0 1 3 2 4
Brazil 3 1 1 1 2 2 3
Spain 3 1 1 1 2 2 3
Sweden 3 0 1 2 1 3 1
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
Peru 3 2 1 0 7 2 5
Netherlands 3 1 1 1 5 3 3
Scotland 3 1 1 1 5 6 3
Iran 3 0 1 2 2 8 1

The first two from each group went forward to constitute groups A and B as follows:

Group A
West Germany
Italy
Austria
The Netherlands

Group B
Argentina
Brazil
Peru
Poland.

The second round results were:

Group A:
Netherlands 5 Austria 1
West Germany 0 Italy 0
West Germany 2 Netherlands 2
Italy 1 Austria 0
West Germany 2 Austria 3
Netherlands 2 Italy 1

Group B:
Brazil 3 Peru 0
Argentina 2 Poland 0
Argentina 0 Brazil 0
Poland 1 Peru 0
Brazil 3 Poland 1
Argentina 6 Peru 0

Round two tables:

Group A P W D L F A Pts
Netherlands 3 2 1 0 9 4 5
Italy 3 1 1 1 2 2 3
West Germany 3 0 2 1 4 5 2
Austria 3 1 0 2 4 8 2
Group B P W D L F A Pts
Argentina 3 2 1 0 8 0 5
Brazil 3 2 1 0 6 1 5
Poland 3 1 0 2 2 5 2
Peru 3 0 0 3 0 10 0

Final result
Buenos Aires 25 June 1978

Argentina: Fillol, Olguin, Galvan, Passarella, Taratini, Ardiles (66 Larossa),
Gallego, Kempes, Bertoni, Luque, Ortiz (78 Houseman).

The Netherlands: Jongbloed, Brandts, Krol, Jansen (73 Suubier), Poortvliet,
Neeskans, Haan, W. Van der Kerkhof, R. Van der Kerkhof,
Rep (58 Nanninga), Resenbrink.

Referee: Sergio Gonella (Italy).

Half time scores in brackets.

Argentina 3 (1) The Netherlands 1 (0) after extra time.
Attendance: 77,260

Scorers:
Kempes (38, 104), Bertoni (115);
Nanninga (82).

Third place playoff

Brazil 2 (0) Italy 1 (1)
Attendance: 76,609

Spain 1982

Spain-1982

The 1982 FIFA World Cup, the 12th FIFA World Cup, was held in Spain from 13 June to 11 July, 1982. Spain was chosen as hosts by FIFA in July 1966. The tournament was won by Italy, after beating West Germany 3–1 in the final. Italy equalled Brazil’s record of winning the World Cup 3 times. For the first time the World Cup was expanded to feature 24 teams, 8 more than in the previous tournament 1978.

Statistics

The first round divisions were:

Group 1:
Poland
Italy
Cameroons
Peru

Group 2:
West Germany
Austria
Algeria
Chile

Group 3:
Belgium
Argentina
Hungary
El Salvador

Group 4:
England
France
Czechoslovakia
Kuwait

Group 5:
Northern Ireland
Spain
Yugoslavia
Honduras

Group 6:
Brazil
Soviet Union
Scotland
New Zealand

The first round results were:

Group 1:
Poland 0 Italy 0
Peru 0 Cameroons 0
Italy 1 Peru 1
Poland 0 Cameroons 0
Poland 5 Peru 1
Italy 1 Cameroons 1

Group 2:
Algeria 2 West Germany 1
Austria 1 Chile 0
West Germany 4 Chile 1
Austria 2 Algeria 0
Algeria 3 Chile 2
West Germany 1 Austria 0

Group 3:
Belgium 1 Argentina 0
Hungary 10 El Salvadore 1
Argentina 4 Hungary 1
Belgium 1 El Salvadore 0
Belgium 1 Hungary 1
Argentina 2 El Salvadore 0

Group 4:
England 3 France 1
Czechoslovakia 1 Kuwait 1
England 2 Czechoslovakia 0
France 4 Kuwait 1
England 1 Kuwait 0
Czechoslovakia 1 France 1

Group 5:
Spain 1 Honduras 1
Northern Ireland 0 Yugoslavia 0
Spain 2 Yugoslavia 1
Northern Ireland 1 Honduras 1
Yugoslavia 1 Honduras 0
Spain 0 Northern Ireland 1

Group 6:
Brazil 2 Soviet Union 1
Scotland 5 New Zealand 2
Brazil 4 Scotland 1
Soviet Union 3 New Zealand 0
Brazil 4 New Zealand 0
Scotland 2 Soviet Union 2

Round one tables:

Group 1 P W D L F A Pts
Poland 3 1 2 0 5 1 4
Italy 3 0 3 0 2 2 3
Cameroon 3 0 3 0 1 1 3
Peru 3 0 2 1 2 6 2
Group 2 P W D L F A Pts
West Germany 3 2 0 1 6 3 4
Austria 3 2 0 1 3 1 4
Algeria 3 2 0 1 5 5 4
Chile 3 0 0 3 3 8 0
Group 3 P W D L F A Pts
Belgium 3 2 1 0 3 1 5
Argentina 3 2 0 1 6 2 4
Hungary 3 1 1 1 12 6 3
El Salvador 3 0 0 3 1 13 0
Group 4 P W D L F A Pts
England 3 3 0 0 6 1 6
France 3 1 1 1 6 5 3
Czechoslovakia 3 0 2 1 2 4 2
Kuwait 3 0 1 2 2 6 1
Group 5 P W D L F A Pts
N. Ireland 3 1 2 0 2 1 4
Spain 3 1 1 1 3 3 3
Yugoslavia 3 1 1 1 2 3 3
Honduras 3 0 2 1 2 3 2
Group 6 P W D L F A Pts
Brazil 3 3 0 0 10 2 6
Soviet Union 3 1 1 1 6 4 3
Scotland 3 1 1 1 8 8 3
New Zealand 3 0 0 3 2 12 0

With the first two going through to round two, the new groups were as follows:

Group A:
Poland
Soviet Union
Belgium

Group B:
West Germany
England
Spain

Group C:
Italy
Argentina
Brazil

Group D:
France
Austria
Northern Ireland

Group A:
Poland 3 Belgium 0
Soviet Union 1 Belgium 0
Poland 0 Soviet Union 0

Group B:
West Germany 0 England 0
Spain 1 West Germany 2
Spain 0 England 0

Group C:
Italy 2 Argentina 1
Brazil 3 Argentina 1
Italy 3 Brazil 2

Group D:
France 1 Austria 0
Northern Ireland 2 Austria 2
France 4 Northern Ireland 1

Round two tables:

Group A P W D L F A Pts
Poland 2 1 1 0 3 0 3
Soviet Union 2 1 1 0 1 0 3
Belgium 2 0 0 2 0 4 0
Group B P W D L F A Pts
West Germany 2 1 1 0 2 1 3
England 2 0 2 0 0 0 2
Spain 2 0 1 1 1 2 1
Group C P W D L F A Pts
Italy 2 2 0 0 5 3 4
Brazil 2 1 0 1 5 4 2
Argentina 2 0 0 2 2 5 0
Group D P W D L F A Pts
France 2 2 0 0 5 1 4
Austria 2 0 1 1 2 3 1
N. Ireland 2 0 1 1 3 6 1

Semi-final results (half time scores in brackets):

Italy 2 (1) Poland 0 (0)
Attendance 50,000

West Germany 3 (1) France 3 (1) after extra time, West Germany won 5-4 on penalties.

Final result
Madrid 11 June 1982

West Germany: Schumacher, Kaltz, K-H Förster, B Förster, Briegel,
Dremmler (62 Hrubesch), Breitner, Stielike,
Rummenigge (81 Müller), Fischer, Littbarski.

Italy: Zoff, Bergomi, Collovati, Scirea, Gentile, Cabrini,
Tardelli, Orialli, Conti, Rossi, Graziani.

Referee: Arnaldo (Brazil).

Half time scores in brackets.

West Germany 1 (0) Italy 3 (0)
Attendance: 90,000

Scorers:
Rossi (56), Tardelli (68), Altobelli (80);
Breitner (82).

Third place playoff

Poland 3 (2) France 2 (1)
Attendance: 28,000.

Mexico 1986

Mexico-1986

The 1986 FIFA World Cup, the 13th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in Mexico from 31 May to 29 June.

Colombia had been originally chosen to host the competition by FIFA but, largely due to economic reasons, was not able to host the competition and officially resigned in 1982. Mexico was selected as the new host in May 1983. The tournament was the second to feature a 24-team format, although unlike the previous edition in 1982, the second round of the tournament was played on a knock-out basis rather than groups. It was won by Argentina (second title after 1978), who beat West Germany 3–2 in the final at Mexico City’s Estadio Azteca.

Statistics

GROUP A GROUP B
Italy – Bulgaria 1:1 (1:0)
Argentina – South Korea 3:1 (2:0)
Italy – Argentina 1:1 (1:1)
Bulgaria – South Korea 1:1 (1:0)
Italy – South Korea 3:2 (1:0)
Argentina – Bulgaria 2:0 (1:0)
Mexico – Belgium 2:1 (2:1)
Paraguay – Iraq 1:0 (1:0)
Mexico – Paraguay 1:1 (1:0)
Belgium – Iraq 2:1 (2:0)
Mexico – Iraq 1:0 (0:0)
Belgium – Paraguay 2:2 (1:0)
GROUP C GROUP D
France – Canada 1:0 (0:0)
USSR – Hungary 6:0 (3:0)
France – USSR 1:1 (0:0)
Hungary – Canada 2:0 (1:0)
France – Hungary 3:0 (1:0)
USSR – Canada 2:0 (0:0)
Brasil – Spain 1:0 (0:0)
N. Ireland – Algeria 1:1 (1:0)
Brasil – Algeria 1:0 (0:0)
Spain – N. Ireland 2:1 (2:0)
Brasil – N. Ireland 3:0 (2:0)
Spain – Algeria 3:0 (1:0)
GROUP E GROUP F
W. Germany – Uruguay 1:1 (0:1)
Denmark – Scotland 1:0 (0:0)
W. Germany – Scotland 2:1 (1:1)
Denmark – Uruguay 6:1 (2:1)
Denmark – W. Germany 2:0 (1:0)
Uruguay – Scotland 0:0
Poland – Morocco 0:0
Portugal – England 1:0 (0:0)
England – Morocco 0:0
Poland – Portugal 1:0 (0:0)
England – Poland 3:0 (3:0)
Morocco – Portugal 3:1 (2:0)

1/8 FINALS
Mexico – Bulgaria 2:0 (1:0)
Belgium – USSR 4:3 (2:2, 0:1)
Brasil – Poland 4:0 (1:0)
Argentina – Uruguay 1:0 (1:0)
France – Italy 2:0 (1:0)
W. Germany – Morocco 1:0 (0:0)
England – Paraguay 3:0 (1:0)
Spain – Denmark 5:1 (1:1)

QUARTERFINALS

France – Brasil 1:1 (1:1, 1:1) penalties: 4:3
W. Germany – Mexico 0:0 penalties: 4:1
Argentina – England 2:1 (0:0)
Belgium – Spain 1:1 (1:1, 0:1) penalties: 5:4

SEMIFINALS
W. Germany – France 2:0 (1:0)
Argentina – Belgium 2:0 (0:0)

3. PLACE GAME
France – Belgium 4:2 (2:2, 2:1)

FINAL
Argentina – W. Germany 3:2 (1:0)

Italy 1990

Italy-1990

The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event twice. Teams representing 116 national football associations from all six populated continents entered the competition, with its qualification process beginning in April 1988. Twenty-two teams qualified from this process, along with host nation Italy and holders Argentina, for the finals tournament.

The tournament was won by West Germany, who claimed their third World Cup title by defeating reigning champions Argentina 1–0 in the final, a rematch of the previous final four years earlier. Hosts Italy beat England 2–1 to finish third after both lost their semi-finals in penalty shootouts.

The 1990 World Cup is widely regarded as one of the poorest World Cups ever. It generated a record low goals-per-game average and a then-record 16 red cards were handed out, including the first ever dismissal in a final.

Despite the low goalscoring, the 1990 World Cup stands as one of the most watched events in television history, garnering an estimated 26.69 billion non-unique viewers, compiled over the course of the tournament. At the time it was the most watched World Cup in history in non-unique viewers, but has subsequently been bettered by the 1994 and 2002 FIFA World Cups.

Statistics

GROUP A GROUP B
Italy – Austria 1:0 (0:0)
Czechoslovakia – USA 5:1 (2:0)
Italy – USA 1:0 (1:0)
Czechoslovakia – Austria 1:0 (1:0)
Italy – Czechoslovakia 2:0 (1:0)
Austia – USA 2:1 (0:0)
Cameroon – Argentina 1:0 (0:0)
Romania – USSR 2:0 (1:0)
Argentina – USSR 2:0 (1:0)
Cameroon – Romania 2:1 (0:0)
Argentina – Romania 1:1 (0:0)
USSR – Cameroon 4:0 (2:0)
GROUP C GROUP D
Brasil – Sweden 2:1 (1:0)
Costa Rica – Scotland 1:0 (0:0)
Brasil – Costa Rica 1:0 (1:0)
Scotland – Sweden 2:1 (1:0)
Brasil – Scotland 1:0 (0:0)
Costa Rica – Sweden 2:1 (0:1)
Colombia – UAE 2:0 (0:0)
W. Germany – Yugoslavia 4:1 (2:0)
Yugoslavia – Colombia 1:0 (0:0)
W. Germany – UAE 5:1 (2:0)
W. Germany – Colombia 1:1 (0:0)
Yugoslavia – UAE 4:1 (2:1)
GROUP E GROUP F
Belgium – South Korea 2:0 (0:0)
Uruguay – Spain 0:0
Belgium – Uruguay 3:1 (2:0)
Spain – South Korea 3:1 (1:1)
Spain – Belgium 2:1 (2:1)
Uruguay – South Korea 1:0 (0:0)
England – Ireland 1:1 (1:0)
Holland – Egypt 1:1 (0:0)
England – Holland 0:0
Ireland – Egypt 0:0
England – Egypt 1:0 (0:0)
Holland – Ireland 1:1 (1:0)

1/8 FINALS
Cameroon – Colombia 2:1 (0:0, 0:0)
Czechoslovakia – Costa Rica 4:1 (1:0)
Argentina – Brasil 1:0 (0:0)
W. Germany – Holland 2:1 (0:0)
Ireland – Romania 0:0 penalties: 5:4
Italy – Uruguay 2:0 (0:0)
Yugoslavia – Spain 2:1 (1:1, 0:0)
England – Belgium 1:0 (0:0, 0:0)

QUARTERFINALS
Argentina – Yugoslavia 0:0 penalties: 3:2
Italy – Ireland 1:0 (1:0)
W. Germany – Czechoslovakia 1:0 (1:0)
England – Cameroon 3:2 (2:2, 1:0)

SEMIFINALS
Argentina – Italy 1:1 (1:1, 0:1) penalties: 4:3
W. Germany – England 1:1 (1:1, 0:0) penalties: 4:3

3. PLACE GAME
Italy – England 2:1 (0:0)

FINAL
W. Germany – Argentina 1:0 (0:0)

United States 1994

United-States-1994

The 1994 FIFA World Cup, the 15th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in the United States from June 17 to July 17 1994. The United States was chosen as hosts by FIFA on 4 July 1988. Brazil became the first nation to win four World Cup titles when they beat Italy 3-2 in a penalty shootout after the game ended 0-0 after extra-time, the first World Cup final to be decided on penalties.

Average attendance was nearly 69,000, which broke records that had stood since 1950, due to the bigger capacities of the American stadiums compared to those of Europe and Latin America. The total attendance for the final tournament of nearly 3.6 million remains the highest in World Cup history, despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams (and from 52 to 64 matches) in 1998. It was also the highest-attended single sport event in U.S. history.

Statistics

GROUP A GROUP B
USA – Switzerland 1:1 (1:1)
Romania – Colombia 3:1 (2:1)
Switzerland – Romania 4:1 (1:1)
USA – Colombia 2:1 (1:0)
Colombia – Switzerland 2:0 (1:0)
Romania – USA 1:0 (1:0)
Sweden – Cameroon 2:2 (1:1)
Brasil – Russia 2:0 (1:0)
Brasil – Cameroon 3:0 (1:0)
Sweden – Russia 3:1 (1:1)
Russia – Cameroon 6:1 (3:0)
Sweden – Brasil 1:1 (1:0)
GROUP C GROUP D
Germany – Bolivia 1:0 (0:0)
South Korea – Spain 2:2 (0:0)
Germany – Spain 1:1 (0:1)
South Korea – Bolivia 0:0
Spain – Bolivia 3:1 (1:0)
Germany – South Korea 3:2 (3:0)
Argentina – Greece 4:0 (2:0)
Nigeria – Bulgaria 3:0 (2:0)
Agrentina – Nigeria 2:1 (2:1)
Bulgaria – Greece 4:0 (1:0)
Nigeria – Greece 2:0 (1:0)
Bulgaria – Argentina 2:0 (0:0)
GROUP E GROUP F
Ireland – Italy 1:0 (1:0)
Norway – Mexico 1:0 (0:0)
Italy – Norway 1:0 (0:0)
Mexico – Ireland 2:1 (1:0)
Ireland – Norway 0:0
Italy – Mexico 1:1 (0:0)
Belgium – Morocco 1:0 (1:0)
Holland – Saudi Arabia 2:1 (0:1)
Belgium – Holland 1:0 (0:0)
Saudi Arabia – Morocco 2:1 (2:1)
Holland – Morocco 2:1 (1:0)
Saudi Arabia – Belgium 1:0 (1:0)

1/8 FINALS
Germany – Belgium 3:2 (3:1)
Spain – Switzerland 3:0 (1:0)
Sweden – Saudi Arabia 3:1 (1:0)
Romania – Argentina 3:2 (2:1)
Holland – Ireland 2:0 (2:0)
Brasil – USA 1:0 (0:0)
Italy – Nigeria 2:1 (1:1, 0:1) golden goal
Bulgaria – Mexico 1:1 (1:1, 1:1) penalties: 3:1

QUARTERFINALS
Italy – Spain 2:1 (1:0)
Brasil – Holland 3:2 (0:0)
Bulgaria – Germany 2:1 (0:0)
Sweden – Romania 1:1 (1:1, 0:0) penalties: 5:4

SEMIFINALS
Brasil – Sweden 1:0 (0:0)
Italy – Bulgaria 2:1 (2:1)

3. PLACE GAME
Sweden – Bulgaria 4:0 (4:0)

FINAL
Brasil – Italy 0:0 penalties: 3:2

France 1998

1998-France-Poster

The 1998 FIFA World Cup, the 16th FIFA World Cup, was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. France was chosen as host nation by FIFA on 1 July 1992. The tournament was won by France, who beat Brazil 3-0 in the final. France won their first title, becoming the seventh nation to win a World Cup, and the first host nation to win the tournament since Argentina in 1978.

Statistics

GROUP A GROUP B
Brasil – Scotland 2:1 (1:1)
Morocco – Norway 2:2 (1:1)
Scotland – Norway 1:1 (0:0)
Brasil – Morocco 3:0 (2:0)
Morocco – Scotland 3:0 (1:0)
Norway – Brasil 2:1 (0:0)
Italy – Chile 2:2 (1:1)
Cameroon – Austria 1:1 (0:0)
Chile – Austria 1:1 (0:0)
Italy – Cameroon 3:0 (1:0)
Italy – Austria 2:1 (0:0)
Chile – Cameroon 1:1 (1:0)
GROUP C GROUP D
Denmark – Saudi Arabia 1:0 (0:0)
France – South Africa 3:0 (1:0)
South Africa – Denmark 1:1 (0:1)
France – Saudi Arabia 4:0 (1:0)
France – Denmark 2:1 (1:1)
South Africa – Saudi Arabia 2:2 (1:1)
Paraguay – Bulgaria 0:0
Nigeria – Spain 3:2 (1:1)
Nigeria – Bulgaria 1:0 (1:0)
Spain – Paraguay 0:0
Spain – Bulgaria 6:1 (2:0)
Paraguay – Nigeria 3:1 (1:1)
GROUP E GROUP F
Mexico – South Korea 3:1 (0:1)
Holland – Belgium 0:0
Belgium – Mexico 2:2 (1:0)
Holland – South Korea 5:0 (2:0)
Belgium – South Korea 1:1 (1:0)
Holland – Mexico 2:2 (2:0)
Yugoslavia – Iran 1:0 (0:0)
Germany – USA 2:0 (1:0)
Germany – Yugoslavia 2:2 (0:1)
Iran – USA 2:1 (1:0)
Germany – Iran 2:0 (0:0)
Yugoslavia – USA 1:0 (1:0)
GROUP G GROUP H
England – Tunisia 2:0 (1:0)
Romania – Colombia 1:0 (1:0)
Colombia – Tunisia 1:0 (0:0)
Romania – England 2:1 (0:0)
Romania – Tunisia 1:1 (0:1)
England – Colombia 2:0 (2:0)
Argentina – Japan 1:0 (1:0)
Croatia – Jamaica 3:1 (1:1)
Croatia – Japan 1:0 (0:0)
Argentina – Jamaica 5:0 (1:0)
Jamaica – Japan 2:1 (1:0)
Argentina – Croatia 1:0 (1:0)

1/8 FINALS
Italy – Norway 1:0 (1:0)
Brasil – Chile 4:1 (3:0)
France – Paraguay 1:0 (0:0, 0:0) golden goal
Denmark – Nigeria 4:1 (2:0)
Germany – Mexico 2:1 (0:0)
Holland – Yugoslavia 2:1 (1:0)
Croatia – Romania 1:0 (1:0)
Argentina – England 2:2 (2:2, 2:2) penalties: 4:3

QUARTERFINALS
France – Italy 0:0 penalties: 4:3
Brasil – Denmark 3:2 (2:1)
Holland – Argentina 2:1 (1:1)
Croatia – Germany 3:0 (1:0)

SEMIFINALS
Brasil – Holland 1:1 (1:1, 0:0) penalties: 4:2
France – Croatia 2:1 (0:0)

3. PLACE GAME
Croatia – Holland 2:1 (2:1)

FINAL
France – Brasil 3:0 (2:0)

Korea & Japan 2002

Korea--Japan-2002

The 2002 FIFA World Cup was the 17th staging of the World Cup, held in the Republic of Korea and Japan from 31 May to 30 June. The two countries were chosen as hosts by FIFA in May 1996 and was the first tournament in its history to be hosted by two countries. It was also the first World Cup held in Asia. This World Cup was also the last wherein the Golden Goal rule was implemented. Brazil won the tournament for a record fifth time, beating Germany 2–0 in the final. Turkey beat Korea Republic 3–2 in the third place match.

Statistics

GROUP A GROUP B
Senegal – France 1:0 (1:0)
Denmark – Uruguay 2:1 (1:0)
France – Uruguay 0:0
Denmark – Senegal 1:1 (1:0)
Denmark – France 2:0 (1:0)
Senegal – Uruguay 3:3 (3:0)
Paraguay – South Africa 2:2 (1:0)
Spain – Slovenia 3:1 (1:0)
Spain – Paraguay 3:1 (0:1)
South Africa – Slovenia 1:0 (1:0)
Spain – South Africa 3:2 (2:1)
Paraguay – Slovenia 3:1 (0:1)
GROUP C GROUP D
Brasil – Turkey 2:1 (0:1)
Costa Rica – China PR 2:0 (0:0)
Brasil – China PR 4:0 (3:0)
Costa Rica – Turkey 1:1 (0:0)
Brasil – Costa Rica 5:2 (3:1)
Turkey – China PR 3:0 (2:0)
South Korea – Poland 2:0 (1:0)
USA – Portugal 3:2 (3:1)
South Korea – USA 1:1 (0:1)
Portugal – Poland 4:0 (1:0)
South Korea – Portugal 1:0 (0:0)
Poland – USA 3:1 (2:0)
GROUP E GROUP F
Ireland – Cameroon 1:1 (0:1)
Germany – Saudi Arabia 8:0 (4:0)
Germany – Ireland 1:1 (1:0)
Cameroon – Saudi Arabia 1:0 (0:0)
Germany – Cameroon 2:0 (0:0)
Ireland – Saudi Arabia 3:0 (1:0)
England – Sweden 1:1 (1:0)
Argentina – Nigeria 1:0 (0:0)
Sweden – Nigeria 2:1 (1:1)
England – Argentina 1:0 (1:0)
Sweden – Argentina 1:1 (0:0)
Nigeria – England 0:0
GROUP G GROUP H
Mexico – Croatia 1:0 (0:0)
Italy – Equador 2:0 (2:0)
Croatia – Italy 2:1 (0:0)
Mexico – Equador 2:1 (1:1)
Mexico – Italy 1:1 (1:0)
Equador – Croatia 1:0 (0:0)
Japan – Belgium 2:2 (0:0)
Russia – Tunisia 2:0 (0:0)
Japan – Russia 1:0 (0:0)
Tunisia – Belgium 1:1 (1:1)
Japan – Tunisia 2:0 (0:0)
Belgium – Russia 3:2 (1:0)

1/8 FINALS
Germany – Paraguay 1:0 (0:0)
England – Denmark 3:0 (3:0)
Senegal – Sweden 2:1 (1:1, 1:1) golden goal
Spain – Ireland 1:1 (1:1, 1:0) penalties: 3:2
USA – Mexico 2:0 (1:0)
Brasil – Belgium 2:0 (0:0)
Turkey – Japan 1:0 (1:0)
South Korea – Italy 2:1 (1:1, 0:1) golden goal

QUARTERFINALS
Senegal – Turkey 0:1 (0:0. 0:0) golden goal
Spain – South Korea 0:0 (0:0, 0:0) penalties: 3:5
Germany – USA 1:0 (1:0)
England – Brazil 1:2 (1:1)

SEMIFINALS
Brazil – Turkey 1:0 (0:0)
Germany – South Korea 1:0 (0:0)

3. PLACE GAME
Croatia – Holland 2:1 (2:1)

FINAL
Germany – Brasil 0:2 (0:0)

Germany 2006

Germany-2006

The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in July 2000. Teams representing 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams qualified from this process, along with the host nation, Germany, for the finals tournament.

The tournament was won by Italy, who claimed their fourth World Cup title. They defeated France 5–3 in a penalty shootout in the final, after extra time had finished in a 1–1 draw. Germany defeated Portugal 3–1 to finish third.

The 2006 World Cup stands as one of the most watched events in television history, garnering an estimated 26.29 billion non-unique viewers, compiled over the course of the tournament. The final attracted an estimated audience of 715.1 million people.[1] The 2006 World Cup ranks fourth in non-unique viewers, behind the World Cup in 1994, 2002, and 1990.[2] As the winner, Italy represented the World in the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup.

This was the first World Cup with three Portuguese-speaking national football teams, namely Portugal, Brazil and Angola. It also first featured the first all-European World Cup semi-finals since 1982.

Statistics

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Germany 9 3 3 0 0 8 2 +6
Ecuador 6 3 2 0 1 5 3 +2
Poland 3 3 1 0 2 2 4 -2
Costa Rica 0 3 0 0 3 3 9 -6

Group B

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
England 7 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3
Sweden 5 3 1 2 0 3 2 +1
Paraguay 3 3 1 0 2 2 2 0
Trinidad & Tobago 1 3 0 1 2 0 4 -4

Group C

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Argentina 7 3 2 1 0 8 1 +7
Netherlands 7 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2
Côte d’Ivoire 3 3 1 0 2 5 6 -1
Serbia & Montenegro 0 3 0 0 3 2 10 -8

Group D

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Portugal 9 3 3 0 0 5 1 +4
Mexico 4 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1
Angola 2 3 0 2 1 1 2 -1
Iran 1 3 0 1 2 2 6 -4

Group E

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Italy 7 3 2 1 0 5 1 +4
Ghana 6 3 2 0 1 4 3 +1
Czech Republic 3 3 1 0 2 3 4 -1
USA 1 3 0 1 2 2 6 -4

Group F

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Brazil 9 3 3 0 0 7 1 +6
Australia 4 3 1 1 1 5 5 0
Croatia 2 3 0 2 1 2 3 -1
Japan 1 3 0 1 2 2 7 -5

Group G

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Switzerland 7 3 2 1 0 4 0 +4
France 5 3 1 2 0 3 1 +2
Korea Republic 4 3 1 1 1 3 4 -1
Togo 0 3 0 0 3 1 6 -5

Group H

Nation Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Spain 9 3 3 0 0 8 1 +7
Ukraine 6 3 2 0 1 5 4 +1
Tunisia 1 3 0 1 2 3 6 -3
Saudi Arabia 1 3 0 1 2 2 7 -5

South Africa 2010

South-Africa-2010

The 2010 FIFA World Cup will be the 19th FIFA World Cup, the premier international football tournament. It is scheduled to take place between 11 June and 11 July 2010 in South Africa. The 2010 FIFA World Cup will be the culmination of a qualification process that began in August 2007 and involved 204 of the 208 FIFA national teams. As such, it matches the 2008 Summer Olympics as the sports event with the most competing nations.

This will be the first time that the tournament has been hosted by an African nation, after South Africa beat Morocco and Egypt in an all-African bidding process. This decision left the Oceania Football Confederation as the only confederation yet to host the FIFA World Cup. Italy are the defending champions. The draw for the finals took place on 4 December 2009 in Cape Town.

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